Accountants to be edged out by robots, says DB CEO

Deutsche Bank chief executive John Cryan says work now done by qualified accountants could soon be carried out by robots.

Cryan told a Frankfurt gathering: “In our bank we have people doing work like robots. Tomorrow we will have robots behaving like people. It doesn’t matter if we as a bank will participate in these changes or not, it is going to happen.”

Deutsche Bank is currently undergoing a restructuring programme led by Cryan, who joined the bank in 2015. Deutsche Bank employs 100,000 people around the world.

Cryan joins other senior banking figures to predict the impact of automation on the profession. Andy Haldane, chief economist at the Bank of England, has said up to 15m jobs are at risk in Britain from the rise of the robot. The former chief executive of Barclays Antony Jenkins has described technology as “an unstoppable force” giving banking an “Uber moment” of disruption.

Automation could lead to better productivity, as accountants are freed from number-crunching to focus on more analytical roles that contribute to strategic direction. However, critics say that automation undermines the market by increasing unemployment, so there are fewer consumers able to buy the products made by robots.

Cryan also said that Frankfurt is set to receive a banking boost from Brexit. The banker said the German city has the regulatory capacity, law firms, consultants and airport capacity to take business from the City of London. Around 4,000 of Deutsche Bank’s 9,000 London-based staff are said to be preparing to move to the city after Brexit.